Joseph Zito
Interviewed by Royce Freeman


WHY DID YOU CHOICE TED WHITE TO PLAY JASON VOORHEES? HE LOOKED VERY OLD IN THE PICTURES I'VE SEEN OF HIM.


Well, he was in his sixties when we used him. And he was he guy that I wanted. They wanted to go with a younger guy who they knew and I wanted to go with Ted. There wasn't actually a lot of thought, when I did Final Chapter, about using a professional stuntman. And I thought it was very very important to use a real professional stuntman, not just some guy to put on the mask and walk around, who had a real careful with weapons around him, and actors. Ted had been a double for Fess Parker on the "Davy Crocket" Daniel Boone series. And he was a very experienced stuntman and I think he was a great choice. I liked his movement, he certainly knew how to. He was a real professional. And by this I am not spar with other Jason actors. I was very happy with the Jason we had.

WHERE THERE ANY PLANS TO BRING BACK ALICE, SINCE HER DEATH IS SORT OF A MYSTERY? I HEARD THAT'S WHY THE PRODUCER'S LEFT HER DEATH OPEN, JUST IN CASE.

Unless it predated my involvement, we never had any a plan to bring her back from the time I was involved with the picture which was early. I was involved before the script started, but there might have been attempts by the producer's to do that, I can't say for sure. But I never heard of any interest of doing that. And I don't think it would have been too difficult to bring her back if we wanted to bring her back. It just never occurred to us creatively to do that.

HOW DID YOU GET THE JOB?

I had made another horror film called The Prowler which was something which I produced and directed. And it was a low budget feature. And in fact Tom Savini did the special effects and makeup on it. And I had heard about Friday the 13th first, about the possibility about doing a Friday the 13th, through someone who had seen The Prowler. And this was a guy who was apparently one of the owners of the Friday the 13th franchise. This was a theater owner in Boston, which was the owner of the Friday the 13th series at the time. Because you remember the Friday the 13th films originally were negative pick-ups for Paramount. So they were owned by someone else but Paramount ended up distributing them. And I got a call from one of the original owners saying that he had seen my film The Prowler. It was an odd call. He said he had seen my film and that it was terrific but it wasn't gonna make a lot of money. He said that if he could call that film Friday the 13th, it would make a fortune. So he said that they had just finished Friday the 13th part three. And he said that if they make another Friday the 13th, he would be calling me. And would want me to be the director. And then sometime thereafter I got a call from him saying that he wanted to do Friday the 13th part four and he would like me to direct it. And we started talking about the story because there was no story for part four at that point.

WAS IT SUPPOSED TO BE THE SURVIVOR OF PART THREE CRYING IN THE WAITING ROOM IN THE HOSPITAL AT THE BEGINNING WHEN THEY WHEEL JASON INTO THE MORGUE?

There was a girl crying. It was actually supposed to be relatives of one of the victims. There was even some dialogue which was filmed but was not used. It was never specified in the script whose family it was. I do not believe that it was the survivor. In other words, I don't believe so, I was not aware of that. I do not remember being aware of that at the time. It was not something that I designed. It was not something that was designed for the script. It might have been something Frank Mancuso Jr. was interested in and she may in fact have been casted. It was nothing I was conscious of.

IS THERE ANY PLANS TO RELEASE A DIRECTOR'S CUT OF THIS?

There were other scenes but there was never a proposal to me to do such a version. And if fact, what you see on the screen, is very much the version I wanted to play. The studio had very little time because we had such a short editing period.

WHERE DID YOU FILM THE MOVIE?

Topanga Canyon, California. We did not shoot it in Connecticut or New Jersey or any place on the East Coast, which were proposed locations. We shot the entire thing in California.

DID YOU EVER WANNA SAY WHERE CRYSTAL LAKE WAS?
Well they didn't specifically, but we didn't use California license plates. We used New Jersey plates. Because the original was shot in that part of the world. So, I thought it was better not to be specific about it. And I didn't wanna talk about specifically where it was because I thought it helped the audience identify if it wasn't locked into one specific place. It was faithful to a Crystal Lake, but I wanted it to be a fictional Crystal Lake so it could have been any place. So I deliberately left that to the imagination.

HAVE YOU EVER MET BRUCE SAKOW AND BARNEY COHEN (the writer's of part 4)? WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

Barney Cohen is in New York. He is a writer. He wrote and possibly produced the pilot for Sabrina The Teenage Witch. Barney is a very active producer. Bruce, I haven't heard from in many years. And I have no idea where he is.

HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE STORY FOR PART 4? DID YOU WANT IT TO BE IN THE SAME TIMELINE AS PARTS 2 AND 3, IN THE SAME WEEK?

I did. And also I had very very extensive conversations with the exhibitor in Boston called originally on the project. He had very strong ideas about what he wanted the film to be about, what elements he wanted in the film. And he had very strong ideas about what scenes and characters he'd like to see in the film. We had very long and extensive meetings. We would meet by telephone because I was in New York at the time. We would meet for one hour every single day by telephone. He would ring me at exactly 8:00 at night, we would talk for one hour, until exactly 9:00 at night.... every single day for months until the script was being developed. I would take those conversations back and meet with Barney Cohen about them and we would implement of course Barney's ideas and my ideas. As far as Bruce, he was only in on the early story stages. The actual screenplay was done by Barney and me.

HOW WAS COREY FELDMAN CAST?

I found him. We were casting, the casting directors brought different people in and I was meeting them. I did all the casting for the movie. I was meeting all the actors who were proposed for the part. Corey, who was a child then of course, was a fan of Friday the 13th, a big fan of Friday the 13th. And even though he had already done some work, this was something which would give him a great deal of visibility. And he wanted to do it personally as a child. He of course had his presentation, his mother was involved in it, and I just chose him based on the meetings I had with him, the readings he did for the part. I thought he was the best one. I mean, it wasn't as if it was written around Corey Feldman. It was written for a young boy and his sister.

WERE YOU ASKED TO COME BACK AND DIRECT PART FIVE?

No, actually I was never asked to do it. And I didn't want to do it. I have never directed sequels to my movies. The films I've done, I've only tried to do single films, and let other people do the sequels. I'm really not particularly interested in directing sequels to my films. You know I've directed Missing In Action and someone else did the sequel. I directed Red Scorpion and someone else did the sequel. But I actually, don't usually watch the sequels. And it is not because I'm pre-supposing they're bad, it's just that I don't want the emotional relationship with the project at that point cause I'm not controlling the project. And I'm more interested in directing films. Although I will tell you that I did have an interest and I did want to do, and had an idea about a film,
Jason Vs. Freddy. And I talked to Frank Mancuso Jr. about it, quite some time ago, after Jason Takes Manhattan. I talked to Frank Mancuso Jr. about it and I also talked to Bob Shaye at the time at New Line Cinema about the idea. And it was something which couldn't get worked out. It was something that everyone seemed to have an interest in, but the ilk could not get worked out because they were both domestic distributors of films. Paramount was a domestic distributor and New Line was a domestic distributor. And the deal couldn't get worked out at that point. And I left and continued to do other projects. And apparently the deal has got worked out, and New Line has taken over the franchise. And I'm very happy to see that this film being made because I think it's a good idea.

IF YOU HAD MADE FREDDY VS. JASON WOULD YOU HAVE KEPT KANE HODDER AS JASON?

I don't know. I didn't think about in terms of specific cast. I had not design about that at all. It's not as if I thought someone could do a better job. I didn't have any design about who might play the character. It was something where I was really hoping to bring some life into these movie icons. I thought the Friday the 13th series had been deteriorating, at least in terms of popularity. I'm not talking about the film, only about how many tickets were sold, and how many people went to see it. And I saw the same thing happening to the Nightmare on Elm Street series. I thought it could be a wonderful wonderful opportunity to create something new which would keep these characters alive.

WHAT STORY DID YOU HAVE IN MIND TO BRING THEM TOGETHER?

I did not have a story. I was really just talking to them about the concept and that I would have wanted to go off and create the story and develop the story. I didn't develop the story and then meet them. I just knew that it was a good idea to have these characters alive. I didn't wanna do what Universal had done with Wolfman Vs. Dracula. I just thought it had really good and hip potential. But it just couldn't be done at the time so I abandoned it and didn't give it anymore attention after that.

WHY WAS THE FINAL CHAPTER MADE TO TAKE PLACE RIGHT AFTER PART THREE?

The real question was always, whether or not we were gonna be in direct continuity with Part Three or if we were gonna pick it up at some later time. I think there was some studio interest in picking it up at a later time. But I wanted it to be in direct continuity. There was some studio interest in getting Jason on his feet, bringing him to life as early as possible. And the theory was that well Jason would be just found, he would come alive immediately and start chasing people around. I didn't wanna do it like that. My view was to make it a film really about death as it opened. And in fact start with a shot which showed him dead. Not a shot that showed him alive, but instead a shot that showed him dead.

WHOSE IDEA WAS IT TO HAVE THE OPENING WITH THE FLASHBACKS TO THE OTHER MOVIES?

That was actually Frank Mancuso Jr.'s idea. That was not my idea, it was not in our original script. And I was actually not a fan of it. The helicopter was the first shot, and the opening was a way to tell the story of how we shot to this shot. That is all prologue as far as I'm concerned. It's expository prologue. For me, the film starts with the helicopter. The idea of illuminating this world. And we crane down on the helicopter light. And the guy who was on the crane with the camera operator, who was Joao Fernandes, the Director of Photography on the film, steps off the crane and they move forward hand-held and they follow the medical workers running through the area with the police activity. They had just discovered Jason, so we discover Jason right at they are about to put the sheet over him. So we can't even think about death. And the studio didn't even wanna record and original score for this. We wanted to just make the score all of the existing pieces or save money. The wanted to make a score of all the existing pieces from all the Friday the 13th movies. The studio wanted to use no new music. I made a strong case to go for an original score and have Harry Manfredini create that. They wouldn't pay for an original score for the entire film. So, I said "Well, if you're not gonna pay for an original score. Here are some pieces that I need, and I especially need something to open the movie because I wanted to create a funereal scene, cause I wanted to make this a film about the death of Jason. I think that Harry did a great job on what he did on the film. The rest of the music was music edit by a music editor named Jack Tillar, an old pro who was wonderful. And he was brought in to help us with the music editing. But the original pieces that Harry did were terrific. And I also needed some period music, cause I have the kids dancing to period music which was recorded originally but I rejected it, Harry did some period music for us, and I rejected it, and it was re-recorded. But the original funereal piece about death was important to me because I wanted Jason to stay dead longer. I kept him dead, and I kept him dead for when they put him into the ambulance, they bring him to the morgue. He stays dead long enough so that I was hoping that the audience would start calling for him to come alive which was what happened in the theaters when it played. So it made the audience co-conspirators of bringing life to him. My view was that if you just brought him to life early on, the audience would groan and say "Yet another film where the guy is dead, but not dead." If you keep him dead long enough, the audience will have that need to see him alive. They wanted to see him alive and they would call for it. They would take responsibility for bringing him to life and they would be more psychologically invested in the movie. So I think it was an important argument that I had with the studio, and I'm happy I won.

HOW DID YOU CAST TINA AND TERRY MOORE?

Well, it was a big search. When the original story was talked about, it had very conventional elements in it. And I brought some things to it which made it a lot harder to do. I decided to set the film, first off, at night. I decided to set the entire film in the rain, which meant we had to create rain everywhere in the movie. I wanted to make it about this young boy, and his sister, which means you had to use a child and go through all the production problems of having his educators on the set. I decided to add a dog to it, which was not in the original concept, and I decided to have these two as twins. So, all of these were met with great groans and consummations by the studio because each one was a big production problem which would make it more difficult to make the movie. But I though that they were each valuable elements in their own right. And I liked the idea very much of having twins. Sort of a metaphor to deal with the question of how similar all of these characters and the victims are. I also did not want it to be primarily girls he was chasing. I did not want to do that. I wanted to make sure we didn't do that.

WHAT MADE YOU THINK TO MAKE THE CHARACTER OF AXLE A REAL PERVERT?

The purpose of it was for indirection. The purpose of it was so that the audience's attention would roll with that in the face of what they knew. Because the audience is very sophisticated about what's going to happen in this movie. They know Axle's in trouble, they know he's gonna get it, and the trick is to try and fend for the audience a little bit so that they're caught at a moment where you run them through a series of emotions before he just gets it. So, Axle I think helps it. That's why Bruce was cast. He was a comedian and I know he was in the Police Academy movies, but I think he might have already done the first Police Academy movie, I'm not sure of the chronology of it. But I think it was a good thing for the film to do that and I think it helped us when Jason does the horrific decapitation.



WERE THERE ANY THINGS CUT FROM THE FILM THAT YOU REALLY WANTED TO HAVE BUT THE MPAA MADE YOU CUT THEM?


Well, there's MPAA cuts throughout the entire movie. I mean every single Savini effect that was filmed was negotiated with the MPAA and trimmed, and trimmed again, and then trimmed a third time. We were under very very tight pressure for the release of the movie.

WHAT ABOUT THOSE SCENE SHOT FOR TV?

They were not shot for TV. They were shot and not used in the film, and then put back into the television version.There was a whole secondary theme of the Jason hunter, and Rob being Jason's hunter. He was avenging his sister Sandra's death, she was in the second movie. And he was using technology, and he had these different things to trip up Jason. And it was a whole secondary theme and frankly I never cared much for it in the first place. We shot some scenes that I didn't think worked very well. I didn't think the props were particularly very good. I think it could have added to such a movie, but didn't add to the movie the way we did it. I mean the scenes were okay. But we made the judgment that they didn't add to the film by keeping them in, and we eliminated them. So, the theatrical version of the picture was the version I wanted to play. I did shoot those other scenes. They needed actually to stretch material. They were included for creative reasons. They needed to stretch the running time when they have to edit for the TV version. They asked me if I had some additional scenes, and I told them what they were. And the scenes ended up getting included. I am not happy that the scenes were included because I took them out cause I thought the film was better without them. As individual scenes, "are they good"? Maybe. But as far as I'm concerned, the better movie didn't have them in it.

HOW LONG WOULD THE FILM HAVE BEEN IF EVERYTHING HAD BEEN LEFT IN THE FILM, INCLUDING YOUR DELETED SCENES AND ALL THE EFFECTS THAT WERE CUT?

Oh, I haven't got the slightest idea. I mean it's just so ordinary to cut these type of movies for television. We're used to having films edited but the point is, it created a running time problem for them. And as you know, this is often solved by either, the choices are, either slowing down the entire movie. You can do this by making a video adjustment to it, and having everything played slightly slower. Or shoot new material or use material that existed. We were lucky that we at least had footage that we could use.

WHAT THERE A TRAILER FOR FRIDAY THE 13TH: THE FINAL CHAPTER?

Yes, there was a trailer for this one. I remember there was a trailer for it, kind of a teaser for it, because I remember taking Corey Feldman to see it. At the time, I think it was playing at the Chinese Theater is Los Angeles. It was a teaser. Though we had very little time to creative this film, to create this cut of the movie.

WHERE THERE TEASERS FOR ALL THE FRIDAY FILMS?

I have no idea what the other films had. We just didn't have the time. Cause that would be created while we were editing the movie. And basically we cut the movie and it went right into the theater. We were on such a very tight editing schedule. The film was originally going to open in July, on Friday the 13th. And they wanted to open on a Friday the 13th, whatever the Friday the 13th was in that area is the date that it was going to open. And Frank Mancuso Sr. wanted to open the picture earlier. They had an availability in April, Friday the 13th. It was virtually impossible for us to get ready for it. It meant we had to edit the movie in six weeks. And we weren't using video, we were using film of course at that point. And the studio asked me if I could get it ready in such a short time. And I said 'Yeah, it's gonna be really difficult but if I bring in teams of editors, people who had worked with me before, we could get it done'. And what Paramount decided to do was that they would rent a house out on the Malibu area, off the beach, and all the editors would move into this house with all the editing equipment, and all the assistants would move in. Nobody would ever leave. In the morning, they would go out, look at the water, and go back inside. We were cutting around the clock. I had three different shifts of editors working on it. And we just stayed there until we finished the picture. Because of the MPAA problems, particularly because we needed to show the death of Jason, we needed to edit the film right so that the essence of his death was still kept with what little we were allowed to show. We really needed to show his death, because the studio really was going to end the series. Paramount's position as they reported it to us, unless they were manipulating us, there was no intention to make another film after this. In fact, Mancuso said to me, "We're not particularly interested in making more of these. We're sort of embarrassed by them." And there was no interest in making additional films. And it was my view that we should keep the ending open just in case. That's why I had the last shot of Corey Feldman at the end looking at camera. I was trying to keep it open, in case the studio wanted to make another one.

DID YOU MAKE IT SO TOMMY WOULD COME BACK AND KILL AS JASON?

I wanted to make it so that Tommy could be Jason. I wanted to make it so that Tommy could be the link into the future even if he's not Jason. I wanted to open the door to other movies, but there wasn't a strong interest by the studio to make other movies, however I did leave it open just in case. It was our idea that Tommy could become another wronged Jason. And we wanted to keep that opened. Which is a good thing because even though it was intended to be The Final Chapter, they did get a Part 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 out of it. We'll get more movies out of it now. It got a syndicated television series. All of this changed. But we were very successful with the film. There was a tremendously huge opening for the film. Frankly I did not expect it to be that successful. It broke records. It not only broke the Friday the 13th's records when it opened, it broke the record for every Paramount Picture, it broke a 70 year record by having the biggest non-holiday weekend in the history of the studio. It was a phenomenal success.

WHY WASN'T IT CALLED FRIDAY THE 13TH PART IV: THE FINAL CHAPTER?

Because we really were presenting it as what would be the end. It wasn't a Part 4 of more Parts. It was in fact the end of the Friday the 13th series and it was what we thought we were doing. It only really became known as Part 4 when more films got made.

WHERE DID YOU FIND THE LOVE MUSIC THE KIDS WERE DANCING TO?

They were conceived of and a lot of time was spent figuring out what they would be dancing to.

WHERE WAS THE HOUSE YOU USED FOR THE PARTY HOUSE??

The house was built. It doesn't exist. The house was one I had made because I wanted the two houses to be in real proximity. The one house exists, Tommy house exists. The house that the kids rent, we built at the time. We designed it for the film based on the script.

WHAT WAS THE NAME OF THE LAKE THAT WAS USED?

Well, there's a lake on a film property out here.

WAS THE FILM SHOT IN REAL PROXIMITY TO ALL THE LOCATIONS OF THE FILM?

There is no real proximity. The lake for instance, is many many miles away. The only real proximity, and that's only because we connected by a single shot, are the two houses, the house of Tommy, and the house of the teenagers that move it. And you'll recall towards the end of the movie, there's a scene where Jason pursues them from one house to the second, in a single Steadycam shot. As a matter of fact, in doing that shot, because we had to create rain for the movie, the Steadycam operator fell and was injured and broke the Steadycam in the making of that shot. But we did get it and the shot appears in the movie. That's the one Steadycam shot that links the two houses together. If it weren't for that shot, if in fact we hadn't gotten it by the time he had fallen and damaged the equipment, you never would have seen those two as actually linked and they could have been anywhere. But we built that house in real proximity so they could be related in a real way from one place to the other. The lake scene was done way up in Santa Barbara which is many many miles away, hours away, from the location where we shot the houses. And the opening scene, which is the house from Friday Part 3, was shot at the Yaluzet Movie Ranch. We actually went back to the exact property that Part 3 was filmed at, which I wanted to do for continuity purposes.

WHERE WAS THE HOSPITAL SCENE SHOT?
There's a hospital in the San Fernando Valley out here which again is an hour away from the real location where Tommy's house was. It had been damaged in an earlier earthquake and it doesn't function as a real hospital but it is only used as a movie set. It is a real hospital and they left all the equipment so it can be used by film companies when they come in and need a hospital set and it functions a hospital set.

WHERE DID YOU FILM THE NEWS SEGMENT?

I shot that before I shot everything else. I shot that in a television studio. So, I wanted it to be shot on tape, and then transferred from tape to the television so it could be photographed. That was the first day of production, it was actually pre-production. We did the one scene, brought the actor in, and did the news room. Somehow in my films, there's always news rooms. I dunno what this means.

WHERE DID YOU COME UP WITH WESSEX COUNTY?

I think it was a combination of Essex County which was a New Jersey county, and Westchester.

WAS THERE ANY FOOTAGE SHOT OF MRS. JARVIS' DEATH?

There was an alternate ending that was shot. It was a fantasy nightmare scene which actually was requested by the owner of the series. And none of us particularly thought it was a good idea. The studio agreed to shoot the scene. It was in the bathtub. It is a fantasy scene of her coming out of the bathtub. Her faces does burst out. She has these white lenses in her eyes. It's a horrific moment but it doesn't really have any meaning as far as I can tell. It was just an excuse to scare the audience. And well it worked in terms of scare, I don't think it worked in terms of anything else. There was a scene by which Trish found her mother and her mother was gonna be alive, even after she was killed by Jason outside. She there, it's the nightmarish theme. She was in fact supposed to be killed by Jason. The fantasy scene was that she was alive and in the bathtub and that the fantasy turns out to be nightmare. She is dead but she doesn't come out of the tub. I mean it wasn't a naked kind of thing. It was the matter of, she's in the tub but you don't see her. You only see her face, and just when her face rises out of the tub-- it's another one of these things out of the water with the awful, these dead eyes. It was just a fright scene, it made little sense really and that's why it was not in the movie.

WHAT WAS CUT FROM THE MOVIE THAT YOU REALLY LIKED AND WANTED TO KEEP?

Because you go through so many variations creating a screenplay, there's so much editing involved in creating a screenplay, and for the director you start visualizing some scenes so clearly that sometimes when you talk about a film that's over ten years old-- I'm not sure which scenes we actually did verses which ones I visualized and talked about. There was a wonderful wonderful scene which I think some version of ended up in a future movie. We had a terrific scene which took place at a diner. And there was a girl in the diner. She was working and was the last one in, and it was right next to railroad tracks. Jason ends up killing her in the diner. It was an absolutely wonderful scene. I did see a version of that which was not the scene that existed in the earlier drafts of the script. But I did see a version of that in one of the later Friday the 13th films.

WHEN JASON KILLED TEDDY IN FRONT OF THE PROJECTOR SCREEN, HOW DID HE MOVE SO QUICKLY ACROSS THE ROOM?

He could be in one place or another and not see. I'll tell you what we did. There were shots so that he actually physically could get to the place. There were always shot so that he could get to the place. But in editing sometimes you cheat at those things in order to make the scenes work and be more deceptive for the audience. You try to be reasonably faithful about how he could have moved from place to place and everyone intended him to have that mythical look. I remember the conversations we had with editors about this. It was originally shot so that Jason could have moved. It had enough time so that Jason could have moved. There were a lot of intercuts. You know, where the film gets cut, Teddy thinks he sees something over by the projector. It cuts back to him, it cuts back to the projector. So, we had all this intercutting so that Jason could move around while this guy was disoriented in the dark room with all the tension only going to one place. Now part of what happens is when you look at the film on tape, if it's not timed as dark as we'd like it to be timed, you get a better sense of the geography you're gonna have. Cause we intended it to a very dark room, where the light is only on the screen and only coming from the projector. And we can only seen some shadows beyond that.

WHAT IS JASON VOORHEES IN YOUR MIND, IS HE REALLY DEAD?

There was a lot of talk about what Jason's abilities really were. And all we really knew about Jason coming into this movie, and I'm not talking about the later films where's he depicted with maggots and all of that stuff. Jason wasn't even clearly a dead thing. You know, he was just something that couldn't be exterminated. He had this zombie-like ability that he couldn't be exterminated. He was alive but could never die. We wanted to depict something which was as definitive as possible in the killing of Jason which was why we did the machete to the head scene. In all kind of mythology, if you loose your head, you're dead. That is something that the audiences have a visual response to at the elimination of the villain. It's done with vampires, it's the traditional thing with zombies. You can shoot zombies in the head. And this is a way you can break the undead's ability to walk. So, we made that choice to do that. And we had a tremendous amount of struggle with the MPAA getting that by because we actually sliced his head. It's a combination of visual EFX and an Anamatronic puppet of Jason. But we were able to get into the film, without any trickery, the MPAA to approve probably the strongest horrific scene which they had approved to that time as far as I could tell. A lot of things might have ended up in the movies which might have been stronger. But that's because people fooled with the MPAA and put footage back after the fact. We didn't. Paramount's not likely to do that. Maybe some of the other little companies would but not the bigger ones.

SO, THE STRONGEST MOMENT OF THE FILM IS THE END?

Well, I dunno if it is the strongest dramatically. It's just physically the most graphic.

WHERE THERE ANY PLANS TO EXPLAIN JASON'S ORIGINS?

No, and it was very deliberate. And it was not an oversight. We decided to make Jason have that element of mystery. And I didn't want to take the mystery away by characters pontificating about him. I mean what's scary about Jason is that he is an undead thing. He is an undead thing that pursues with a purpose. And I think that for us at that point in the series, with the information, the audience has walking into the theater, we were better keeping him as in the series, where he could not be killed. That was horrific in and of itself. And there was no way to put the spotlight on that and make it more terrifying. In fact, for me the films less effective once I actually saw him come out of a grave with maggots. To the fans, Jason clearly was a dead thing. I think it is less effective as an audience to know where those origins are. It is scarier when you do not know.



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